Symptoms and Treatments of Sinus Tachycardia

Symptoms
With regard to sinus tachycardia, the population studied tended to distinguish minor symptoms, which they associated with drug therapy, from major symptoms, which they attributed to lack of medical treatment. “Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is characterized by an increased resting heart rate, or an increase in apparent sinus node rate disproportionate to the level of physical activity or emotional stress (100 or more beats/minute, or an increase to100 beats/minute or more with minimal exertion). However, some patients with IST have normal heart rates when supine. Patients may be relatively asymptomatic or may have incessant, debilitating tachycardia. Unexplained heart rate accelerations tend to occur frequently. Unlike paroxysmal tachycardias, however, these accelerations come on slowly and stop slowly.” (Bosen, 2002)

Additionally, Abbott (2005) has mentioned “Any arrhythmia, including sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, premature ventricular contractions, or ventricular tachycardia, can cause palpitations. Palpitations should be considered as potentially more serious if they are associated with dizziness, near-syncope, or syncope.”

The perception of protection conferred by treatment observed in the present study might also apply to communities where access to treatment is readily available. The extent to which this perception exists in endemic areas needs to be determined so that apparent contradictions of this type can be addressed in future treatments. “Symptoms of IST include palpitations, dizziness or light-headedness, shortness of breath, near syncope, and chest discomfort.” (Bosen, 2002). Although inappropriate sinus tachycardia symptoms are common, there are now many effective treatments. Inappropriate sinus tachycardia remains one of the most common and medical conditions encountered by a wide range of physicians and surgeons. Understanding of its epidemiology, pafhophysiology, diagnosis, and, especially, treatment has advanced and continues to develop rapidly.

Treatments
Drug Therapy
Bosen (2002) also stresses that when choosing the drug therapy, patient’s age, lifestyle, and medical history record should take into consideration. Since the mediation might last long, a young patient or a mother of childbearing age might not be suitable for this treatment. “Drug therapy, the usual starting place for treating IST, takes aim at the sinus node; however, the sinus node's response to drugs is extremely variable. Patients with sinus node dysfunction are more susceptible to adverse reactions from cardiac drugs, so monitor them closely. Automaticity of atrial tissue and conduction speed through the AV node may also be targeted during drug therapy.” (Bosen, 2002). In fact, drug treatment should relate to demographics, medical history, current signs and symptoms, and quantitative disease measures, including some measured again later in the study as outcomes.

Radiofrequency catheter ablation
Bosen (2002) also mentions that radiofrequency catheter ablation is an alternative for any patients who do not want long-term drug therapy or not respond well to medical management. “In the past, radiofrequency ablation for IST involved total ablation of the sinus node, resulting in a functional escape rhythm and the need for permanent pacemakers in some patients. But recent studies have shown that modification of the sinus node is a feasible or more promising alternative to total ablation. The goal of modification is to salvage sinus node function while eliminating the high rates of sinus tachycardia that produce symptoms.” (Bosen, 2002). I believe that no differential effects are observed and treatment congruency do not increase effectiveness. This treatment can be considered as preparation for stressful medical procedures.

Surgery
Surgery is considered as a last resort. “If all other treatments have failed, the physician may recommend surgical excision of the sinus node. Because this treatment requires openheart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and its associated risks, it is a last resort.” (Bosen, 2002) Medical-surgical treatments, by nature of the diversity of practice settings, are in a key position to reduce patient delay in seeking any alternative treatments. This treatment is important for patients to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with this life-threatening emergency. Prompt and definitive care may eliminate the infarct or reduce the infarct size, and thereby reduce the length and complexity of the hospital course. As an ultimate result, lives will be saved, heart muscle damage will be reduced or avoided, and more patients will return to active and productive lives.

Conclusion
Clinical trial reports need a clearly defined policy on uses of baseline data, especially with respect to many adjustment and analysis. Any suggestion is probably to choose the best suitable for the patients. Shen (2002) also concludes that “[T]he precise role of sinus node modification in patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia remains to be determined. Sinus node modification could be considered in patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia with persistently increased heart rate in the absence of any autonomic abnormalities. Autonomic laboratory testing should be performed to exclude any evidence of autonomic dysregulation. Clinical research on the pathophysiology of inappropriate sinus tachycardia should be pursued vigorously.”

It is safe to defer coronary bypass surgery for many heart-related symptoms patients until the symptoms worsen significantly and less drastic drug therapy no longer controls the pain.(100 or more beats/minute, or an increase to100 beats/minute or more with minimal exertion). However, some patients with IST have normal heart rates when supine. Patients may be relatively asymptomatic or may have incessant, debilitating tachycardia. Unexplained heart rate accelerations tend to occur frequently. Unlike paroxysmal tachycardias, however, these accelerations come on slowly and stop slowly.” (Bosen, 2002) Additionally, Abbott (2005) has mentioned “Any arrhythmia, including sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, premature ventricular contractions, or ventricular tachycardia, can cause palpitations. Palpitations should be considered as potentially more serious if they are associated with dizziness, near-syncope, or syncope.” The perception of protection conferred by treatment observed in the present study might also apply to communities where access to treatment is readily available. The extent to which this perception exists in endemic areas needs to be determined so that apparent contradictions of this type can be addressed in future treatments. “Symptoms of IST include palpitations, dizziness or light-headedness, shortness of breath, near syncope, and chest discomfort.” (Bosen, 2002). Although inappropriate sinus tachycardia symptoms are common, there are now many effective treatments. Inappropriate sinus tachycardia remains one of the most common and medical conditions encountered by a wide range of physicians and surgeons. Understanding of its epidemiology, pafhophysiology, diagnosis, and, especially, treatment has advanced and continues to develop rapidly. Treatments Drug Therapy Bosen (2002) also stresses that when choosing the drug therapy, patient’s age, lifestyle, and medical history record should take into consideration. Since the mediation might last long, a young patient or a mother of childbearing age might not be suitable for this treatment. “Drug therapy, the usual starting place for treating IST, takes aim at the sinus node; however, the sinus node's response to drugs is extremely variable. Patients with sinus node dysfunction are more susceptible to adverse reactions from cardiac drugs, so monitor them closely. Automaticity of atrial tissue and conduction speed through the AV node may also be targeted during drug therapy.” (Bosen, 2002). In fact, drug treatment should relate to demographics, medical history, current signs and symptoms, and quantitative disease measures, including some measured again later in the study as outcomes. Radiofrequency catheter ablation Bosen (2002) also mentions that radiofrequency catheter ablation is an alternative for any patients who do not want long-term drug therapy or not respond well to medical management. “In the past, radiofrequency ablation for IST involved total ablation of the sinus node, resulting in a functional escape rhythm and the need for permanent pacemakers in some patients. But recent studies have shown that modification of the sinus node is a feasible or more promising alternative to total ablation. The goal of modification is to salvage sinus node function while eliminating the high rates of sinus tachycardia that produce symptoms.” (Bosen, 2002). I believe that no differential effects are observed and treatment congruency do not increase effectiveness. This treatment can be considered as preparation for stressful medical procedures. Surgery Surgery is considered as a last resort. “If all other treatments have failed, the physician may recommend surgical excision of the sinus node. Because this treatment requires openheart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and its associated risks, it is a last resort.” (Bosen, 2002) Medical-surgical treatments, by nature of the diversity of practice settings, are in a key position to reduce patient delay in seeking any alternative treatments. This treatment is important for patients to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with this life-threatening emergency. Prompt and definitive care may eliminate the infarct or reduce the infarct size, and thereby reduce the length and complexity of the hospital course. As an ultimate result, lives will be saved, heart muscle damage will be reduced or avoided, and more patients will return to active and productive lives. Conclusion Clinical trial reports need a clearly defined policy on uses of baseline data, especially with respect to many adjustment and analysis. Any suggestion is probably to choose the best suitable for the patients. Shen (2002) also concludes that “The precise role of sinus node modification in patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia remains to be determined. Sinus node modification could be considered in patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia with persistently increased heart rate in the absence of any autonomic abnormalities. Autonomic laboratory testing should be performed to exclude any evidence of autonomic dysregulation. Clinical research on the pathophysiology of inappropriate sinus tachycardia should be pursued vigorously.” It is safe to defer coronary bypass surgery for many heart-related symptoms patients until the symptoms worsen significantly and less drastic drug therapy no longer controls the pain.

http://www.gradingrocket.com

Обратите внимание, что эффективность средств народной медицины научно не доказана. Информация, размещенная на этой и иных страницах данного сайта, предназначена исключительно для ознакомления и обсуждения с врачом.

Обязательно проконсультируйтесь с врачом перед лечением.